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Mark

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About Mark

  • Rank
    Veteran Member
  • Birthday October 17

Personal Information

  • Name
    Mark
  • Orientation
    Aromantic Pansexual
  • Gender
    Gender Queer
  • Pronouns
    They, Mx
  • Location
    United Kingdom
  • Occupation
    IT

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  1. This is a classical example of the appeal to nature logical fallacy. A rather questionable one since the vast majority of mammals don't "pair down" in the first place. There's this recently released study. Which shows it's only a minority (14%) of single people who conform to the amantonormative stereotype of single mindedly seeking to be coupled. Also notable that 10% are exclusively interested in casual dating.
  2. Which leads to people questioning if the are aro (enough) if they don't want a Queer Platonic Relationship or Platonic Life Partner. (Similarly for aros who don't do squishes.) It potentially works for allo aces. Since romantic relationships look very similar regardless of if they are sexual or not. There are also aros who want relationships which are neither romantic nor QPRs.
  3. I think one person figure for each of these, seven. terms would be a better. Having them in a circle might also imply a lack of hierarchy. As this stands someone could interpret the list of the right as hierarchical.
  4. They are likely to do this unless you try very hard to stop them. Since progression/escalation along with relationship hierarchy is a part of amantonormativity. Odds on the typical allo will conflate the whole thing with "friends first" or "romo lite". It's not that hard to find definitions of QPRs which strongly imply "in between". As well as descriptions which are very much romance like.
  5. This also doesn't make much sense when the first part describes six different types of attraction (or orientation). Though it is hard to represent six dimensions in two. Even more so with this article which described 37 types of attraction not all of which are independent. Many aros might consider romantic relationships to be "less than" any type of non-romantic relationship. Giving only two examples easily leads to false dichotomies even where this is unintentional. I think the idea of ranking of relationships is inherently problematic. Including involving multiple logical fallacies.
  6. There are non-romantic relationships, such as "Platonic Life Partners", which can can be similar to romantic relationships in terms of structure, dynamics, hierarchy, etc. Not sure that this applies. Since non-sexual romantic relationships are little different from sexual romantic relationships. Indeed Professor Brake's definition makes no direct mention of such relationships being sexual.
  7. Very often alloromantics conflate "committed", "meaningful" and so on with "romantic."
  8. Maybe have allo(romantic) characters who are portrayed as shallow, manipulative, abusive or creepy towards an aro lead.
  9. What matters to me is that so many activities are romantic coded.
  10. They might be "between relationships". There are also allos for whom promiscuity is their method to "find the one(TM)". It's a fictional cliché, maybe one which only makes sense in an amantonormative culture. Leaving aside the (cis) hetero stereotypes of this both of the characters involved have to be allo. Even allos tend to see romantic behaviour from people they are not romantically attracted to as creepy.
  11. There is also self perpetuation involved here. Something is unusual about the ace community is recognition of variorientation. Whilst in straight, LGBTQ+ and even many aro (and aspec) communities periorientation is assumed as a default. With it even being possible to find LGBTQ+ and aspec communities which variorientation is somehow an "ace thing". (It's also commonly the case with kink, polyamory, relationship anarchy, etc communities are "perinormative.) It's very hard to find information about aro-allos even when you know the right terms to look for. Even then it's still easier to turn up aro-ace and (even) allo-ace writings.
  12. Even assuming five types of attraction that still gives, at least. thirty one possibilities.
  13. Discussing romance can even be an expectation. In contexts such as celebrity gossip or "shipping" fictional characters. It's very much a normative to conflate sexual and romantic. With aro aces being just as likely to do this as other perioriented people. A part of this is that even with issues such as "marriage equality" the language used tends to be "sexual orientation". The experiences of aro aces are likely to differ, substantially, from those of either allo aces or aro allos. That we tend to have "ace communities" which tend to favour allo aces and "aro communities" which very much favour aro aces is another possible reason for greater asexual visibility and awareness.
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