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A BRIEF HISTORY OF ROMANTIC LOVE AND WHY IT KIND OF SUCKS


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This was a great read. no false advertising in your post. The whole idea of parents choosing partners because they had somewhat objective views on potential suiters was still embraced somewhat in the early-mid 20th century. Apparently it was a thing for a girl to bring a parent on her first date, or have the first date at home so parents could pass judgement.  

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8 minutes ago, Apathetic Echidna said:

This was a great read. no false advertising in your post. The whole idea of parents choosing partners because they had somewhat objective views on potential suiters was still embraced somewhat in the early-mid 20th century. Apparently it was a thing for a girl to bring a parent on her first date, or have the first date at home so parents could pass judgement.  

Sounds odd but logical?

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2 minutes ago, SamwiseLovesLife said:

Sounds odd but logical?

I watched for fun a show about vintage vs modern advice, specifically the dating episode. I found it hilariously ridiculous. But the girl following the vintage advice found it made so much sense as she had in the past dated someone for 3 weeks who had shown up to their first date drunk and was a horrible person, and said if her mother was there that wouldn't have happened. I was shocked that she would need her mother there to tell her that! 

If you are interested it is the drunk tinder date clip http://iview.abc.net.au/collection/growing-up-gracefully 

(which is from episode 2) I don't know how the link will work for a non-Australian IP

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I rather question their fifth and sixth "facts".
The concept of "brotherly love" is known as "philia" in Classical Greek  Which is not at all specific to the works of Plato.
I'm very skeptical of the idea that Plato or anyone else in Classical Europe, (West) Asia or (North) Africa would have had made much mention of "romantic love". It's far from clear how you would even describe it in Classical Greek, except possibly as some form of mental illness.
What Plato actually described was a form of homoerotic love. The redefinition of it meaning "non sexual/erotic" happened around the same time that "courtly love" become linked to "erotic love" and transitioned into our modern idea of "romantic love".

Outside of highly amantonormative societies it seems likely that only a fairly small proportion of people would seek romance at all. With there being no historical example of such a society. Thus I question the idea that societies prior to the 20th century actually did much to curb romance, except possibly on the rare occasion it did actually present a serious problem.

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7 hours ago, Mark said:

What Plato actually described was a form of homoerotic love.

Well, what he wrote in different works is not the same.

 

In Phaedrus, Plato is the most prudish, but even there we don't come anywhere near the modern conception of platonic love.

 

I don't think that the conception of love described there can be easily classified, it seems sui generis. The relationship is infused with sexual tension which is mostly held in check. Though sensual acts are a normal part of it.

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14 hours ago, Mark said:

I rather question their fifth and sixth "facts".
The concept of "brotherly love" is known as "philia" in Classical Greek  Which is not at all specific to the works of Plato.
I'm very skeptical of the idea that Plato or anyone else in Classical Europe, (West) Asia or (North) Africa would have had made much mention of "romantic love". It's far from clear how you would even describe it in Classical Greek, except possibly as some form of mental illness.
What Plato actually described was a form of homoerotic love. The redefinition of it meaning "non sexual/erotic" happened around the same time that "courtly love" become linked to "erotic love" and transitioned into our modern idea of "romantic love".

Outside of highly amantonormative societies it seems likely that only a fairly small proportion of people would seek romance at all. With there being no historical example of such a society. Thus I question the idea that societies prior to the 20th century actually did much to curb romance, except possibly on the rare occasion it did actually present a serious problem.

 

Whatever

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funny and enjoyable read

 

biased tho :P

agreed that romantic love is overplayed and dangerous. but, the guy's pretty negative about it.

 

dunno enough about anything to form any constructive criticisms tho. so,

 

funny, and enjoyable to read. with a purpose that generates thought. https://www.prospectingaustralia.com.au/forum/plugins/ezbbc/style/smilies/thumbsup.png

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