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aihpen

Can cis people feel dysphoria?

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On 10/27/2016 at 4:08 PM, Miles said:

Okay, I'm a mental health major and sociology nerd, there's a chapter on gender in my psych textbook, and I'm a dysphoric nonbinary person whose first binder should arrive within about three weeks. When people are uncomfortable with expectations to be feminine or masculine, that's called gender role strain. And if they want to do something like bind, take hormones, get surgery, use different pronouns, if they're uncomfortable with people seeing them as strictly male/female, if they want to use a gender ambiguous nickname...well, they might want to look into whether they're actually cis.

You know, I never knew there was a term for it and I am very thankful for your expertise. I sometimes have cis people tell me they "never think about their gender(But being expected to (insert gender role stereotype here) annoys them too) so what makes them different than me who is nonbinary" and I didnt know there was a term to describe it so thank you. 

I have dysphoric hypomania as well as gender dysphoria so to me it was always a clearly definable feeling for me so pinpointing it didnt take a lot of effort/existential angst.

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Disphoria is discomfort related to something with which one consciously or unconsciously identifies in the self. Hair, libido, gender, warts, foreskins, hymens, skin color, blemishes, moles, roles, responsibilities, fetishes, affections, religion, political orientation, one's place in the bell curve ...

 

Disphoria brings us to change the self. It can be healthy. It can be dangerous. Unawares it can hurt other people. How one chooses to respond to disphoria is the important thing.

 

If the exploration of life's possibilities leads to high risk  and abusive behaviors, beware! Disphoria may have causes that are not yet available to consciousness and reason.  

 

Getting help from kind and interested people is cool. They can help one to be more self-aware, self-accepting, and fruitful.

 

 

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I've had some gender identity adventures, but right now I'm a cis lady. I sometimes experience body dysphoria. I have PCOS! My medical condition causes my hormones to be different than what is considered "appropriate" for a woman.  I have grown more body hair and in more places than a lot of my cis peers.  My voice deepened a little, and the weight on my body actually shifted some too. My muscle to fat ratio changed; I usually call it my second puberty 😅

To me, it's not surprising that I have had conversations with trans women where we're able to bond because we've struggled to hide naturally occurring bits of ourselves to blend in with women who are considered more socially acceptable.  I am, however, aware that my rejection would not be as severe as a trans woman's if we both forgot to shave for example. :C

Hmm... I think that's part of why I don't refer to my dysphoria as gender dysphoria although it is linked to my gender. The origins of the term 'gender dysphoria' also make it feel like the wrong term for me.

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On 10/1/2016 at 4:55 PM, aihpen said:

I am a cis woman and I experience body dysphoria. It has nothing to do with gender so I wouldn't call it "gender dysphoria". It is basically when my internal sense of physical self does not match what I see reflected back to me in the mirror, resulting in feelings of disappoinment, embarrassment, and depression.

 

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I think they can. As you said, it's possible for a trans person to not be dysphoric, so it must be possible the other way around, unless I'm also missing something and that logic is flawed somehow.

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I have a friend who was so severely dysphoric about her breasts that she thought she was trans and was going to have them removed as part of transitioning. Her parents insisted she see a therapist first. She eventually realised she wasn't trans and managed to work through her dysphoria around her breasts. 

 

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