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Just had an existential crisis.


SwiftySpeedy

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Well if there’s nothing after death, we’re physically incapable of imagining that since the best we can imagine is darkness eternal, yet you’re still there for that, so that’s not what it is either.

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I JUST FUCKING ENDED IT WOHOOOOO!!!!!!!. WE DON'T LIVE IN THE MIDDLE AGES, WE LIVE IN THE WORLD OF M E D I C I N E, CRYOPRESERVATION THAT COSTS AS MUCH AS A USED TESLA AND SO MUCH FUCKING MORE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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Personally, I’m not afraid of death. Lots of my family is dead, it happens to everybody. I still care about them and talk to them, so what is there to be scared of? In my culture death is just another part of life. I think a lot of people fear death because their cultures teach them to do so, that it’s something you should never talk about and only ever be scared and upset about, but it’s not. It’s just a thing that happens. Like Oingo Boingo said, no one lives forever.

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From a secular standpoint, death can mean the event of dying and the state of non-existence. This muddles the waters: Do we fear the event or the non-existence?

We observe that the vast majority of people strongly fear death as an event and endure a lot to avoid it. Because of the loss it means to us. Of course there are exceptions, like Socrates or Seneca for example, but those are considered especially wise.

So I'm a bit skeptical that this can be so easily separated from the fear of "death as state". It's easy to say when you're young and healthy ...

Fear of death-as-state is usually attacked by the famous argument of Epicurus:

"If I am, then death is not. If Death is, then I am not. Why should I fear that which can only exist when I do not? Long time men lay oppressed with slavish fear."

But first, emotions aren't rational or irrational anyway, only in a metaphorical sense.

Second, his axiom: "It is irrational to fear what you can't experience" is strange. Why do people write a will? Or when a dying mother fears for the future of her children, this would be considered "irrational" too by Epicurus' axiom. So his argument has some serious holes.

8 hours ago, Jot-Aro Kujo said:

Lots of my family is dead, it happens to everybody.

IMHO, just because something happens to everybody, it doesn't make it better.

Of course, it is in some sense good advice to accept what cannot be changed. The problem is that it is impossible to find out "what really cannot be changed" with absolute certainty.

E.g. @SwiftySpeedy now is into cryonics. I'm very strongly convinced that with current technology this doesn't work, but there's a chance I'm wrong. There is no big temptation for most people because it is widely regarded as a fraud.

8 hours ago, Jot-Aro Kujo said:

In my culture death is just another part of life.

And on one reading this is true, but trivial and uninteresting: death is the limit of life and belongs to it this way.

But in a more serious sense, it is doubtful: if materialism is true then death terminates life under any sensible understanding (consciousness), so the state of being dead does not belong to life.

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