Jump to content

Study of friendship changes as people date/get married


Recommended Posts

https://www.psychologytoday.com/gb/blog/living-single/202202/whos-most-likely-shed-their-old-friends

Not directly related to aromanticism but something I think some people here will be interested in.

Its an article about a study of people's friendships asking single people, people dating, people married/cohabiting and married/cohabiting whose children left (~3000 people total). The groups in those relationships average fewer friends and see them less often, and there might be a trend in this with the empty nest group at one end with least friends/time seeing them and the single people at the other.

There are a few caveats pointed out, Its different groups rather than tracking the same people as they move, say from dating to cohabiting. We're talking averages as well so some people might have the opposite effect. But overall I found it interesting that this idea that people might shed their friends as they go into a romantic relationship is being studied.

I guess this is a common idea in aro circles that people will ditch their friends as they find this romantic ideal, seems like there is now some science behind that ?

  • Like 11
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for the article !

I find it interesting because even if this is talked a lot in aro circles, outside the people I met say "this is not true we don't do that, why do aros think we don't value friendship". It's nice to have an actual study about it.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
On 2/28/2022 at 9:11 AM, nonmerci said:

I find it interesting because even if this is talked a lot in aro circles, outside the people I met say "this is not true we don't do that, why do aros think we don't value friendship". It's nice to have an actual study about it.

yeah, its really good that this research does exist. Not just that but multiple studies with different methodologies, some with large samples of people, some comparing different people and some following the same people over time. Many studies drawing towards similar conclusions makes me quite confident that this idea is true.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 months later...

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...