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Myers Briggs

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Took the Big Five test:

 

Openness: 70th percentile

Conscientiousness: 46th percentile

Extroversion: 15th percentile

Agreeableness: 4th percentile

Neuroticism: 93rd percentile

 

Not sure how accurate that is (I don't think I'm that disagreeable!) but there you have it.

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I think this topic would benefit from a poll :P

 

Anyway, I have only ever gotten two results. ISFP-J and INFP-J. 

 

I just took the Big Five...

Openness: 16th percentile

Conscientiousness: 13th percentile

Extroversion: 2nd percentile

Agreeableness: 14th percentile

Neuroticism: 98rd percentile

 

Well that kind of makes me seem like a horrible person but whatever :rofl:

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On 2/17/2017 at 6:59 PM, Ettina said:

I'm XNXP.

And I'm not a big fan Myers-Briggs types, because a) the Myers-Briggs scale isn't very well validated scientifically, and b) all four 'dimensions' that the Myers-Briggs measures are normally distributed, meaning that most people are right near the border on most traits and the classification as (for example) extrovert or introvert depends on only a couple points difference in score. Hence why I used the Xs above for the two dimensions that I scored close to 50% on.

Of the INFP, which I get, I only score closer to the 50% regarding the F/T-part. Myers-Briggs may not be scientifically validated very well, but we're talking about psychology here anyway... not exactly the hardest of the sciences.

And if you score close to the extremes, it seems to be pretty useful. A mixture of the descriptions of INFP and INTP applies to me really well, with the INFP description more strongly. (Ok, you see people claiming such things about horoscopes, too. ;))

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4 hours ago, DeltaV said:

Of the INFP, which I get, I only score closer to the 50% regarding the F/T-part. Myers-Briggs may not be scientifically validated very well, but we're talking about psychology here anyway... not exactly the hardest of the sciences.              

Careful! I'm a psych major!  

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you know what I'm going to post now, right?

Spoiler

purity.png


or maybe that's more fitting:

Spoiler

xkcd-purity2-by-sansscience-creativecomm

Still, psychologists lose. ;)

 

Okay, another problem with all of the Myers-Briggs questionnaires I have seen (I have no access to the authoritative one) is that getting a high score on “thinking”, doesn't necessarily mean you're a rational thinker.

 

It only means that you believe you value reason, mainly try to use logical arguments to convince people and have a lower tolerance for views which don't seem rational to you.

 

But, of course, you may mostly think irrationally, you may often use faulty arguments and dismiss views as objectively wrong which may be justifiable.

 

I guess Ayn Rand would be a very strong T, but to see her as a good example of a rational thinker ... no, no.

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Ahhh... I am an INTP, though I would like to point out that MBTI is not just test stuff and 16Personalities is pretty inaccurate. There are cognitive functions things which is what the theory is actually based on and they are actually not founded upon "dichotomies" as it is currently being sold as. For anyone who is interested in "function stuff" or "an actual accurate sounding description of what types and that personality theory even is" I would suggest checking this blog first: http://mbti-notes.tumblr.com/

 

So yeah. Dichotomies tend to be fairly off, or don't make as much sense to me..

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20 hours ago, ApeironStella said:

There are cognitive functions things which is what the theory is actually based on and they are actually not founded upon "dichotomies" as it is currently being sold as.

 

I did actually read a fair bit on Myers-Briggs a few years back, when I first stumbled upon a few of the online tests (I got INTP on them as well) - and it was the cognitive function stuff that was the most interesting to me.

 

For example, if we consider introverted vs. extrovered thinking processes: the way I often experience conversations is that I'm still thinking how I should structure my reply to what was just said - meanwhile the conversation has already jumped ahead another 16 new topics! Introverts (like me) would tend to do their thinking in their heads and then vocalise a finished 'output' (I'm thinking of Paul Dirac here, for example: "I was taught at school that you should never start a sentence without knowing the end of it." - well, that is a very 'introvert' way to look at conversing!) Introverted thinkers might not 'show their working', so sometimes their final vocalised thought isn't easy for other people to follow without some additional elaboration. Whereas extroverted thinkers would tend to 'think out loud' and submit any intermediary steps to the group for feedback, so as to arrive at a more finished and coherent final thought by a kind of process of consensus (maybe - bear in mind I'm not an extrovert - but at least some extroverted friends have told me that they do something like this)

 

Or, say, the perceiving/judging function - I think of this a bit like 'collapsing the wave-function' in quantum mechanics, lol. Just how much data do you need to take in before you can make a final decision one way or the other? With me, the default answer tends to be "a lot!" I'm paranoid about jumping to an incorrect conclusion before all the facts are in, so I'm extremely indecisive - even in terms of really trivial matters like picking a restaurant to eat in, for example! (much safer to defer that decision to somebody else so that I can't be blamed for any catastrophic outcomes :D) The good side of it is that any important life decisions I make tend to be quite well thought through (well, assuming I'm able to actually make the decision one way or the other, despite myself! :rofl:)

 

I still think it has its potential problems as a properly 'scientific' theory. I mean, telling an interesting internally consistent "story" that seems to account for a fair amount of subjective psychological experience is one thing; but getting very specific and falsifiable predictions out of that same framework is something else again and I'm not sure how well Myers-Briggs cognitive functions theory succeeds here. I also worry about sentences like this one from the blog you posted :

 

Quote

 Type outlines your cognitive preferences but humans presumably have free will, so you can choose to override those preferences whenever necessary.

 

I don't really know what that sentence means. What is the "you" that is being referred to in this context of doing the overriding? Movements of the Pineal Gland, perhaps? :P I have never anywhere seen a definition of "free will" that I could make any sense out of, so I'm not sure what business it has in outlining a properly 'scientific' theory of cognitive processes...

 

My views on Myers-Briggs overall as a system/framework are probably similar to those @James posted earlier in this thread:

On 1/30/2017 at 5:28 AM, James said:

It was a decent attempt at the impossibly complex task of quantifying who someone is. 

 

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ENF P/J :D I got a huge on the E

My P and J switch each time because I'm pretty much bang in the middle

 

On 01/05/2017 at 4:48 PM, NullVector said:

Whereas extroverted thinkers would tend to 'think out loud' and submit any intermediary steps to the group for feedback, so as to arrive at a more finished and coherent final thought by a kind of process of consensus (maybe - bear in mind I'm not an extrovert - but at least some extroverted friends have told me that they do something like this)

 

Most definately what I do :) I feel bad for word-vomiting everywhere but I generally prefer group opinion and get so exited it all just comes out before I think

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On 5/1/2017 at 5:48 PM, NullVector said:

I don't really know what that sentence means. What is the "you" that is being referred to in this context of doing the overriding? Movements of the Pineal Gland, perhaps? :P I have never anywhere seen a definition of "free will" that I could make any sense out of, so I'm not sure what business it has in outlining a properly 'scientific' theory of cognitive processes...

Well, as Norbert Wiener said: “Tyche is as relentless a mistress as Ananke.”

 

But there are also many other important concepts which cannot be defined rigorously, what is “probability” for example?

On 5/1/2017 at 5:48 PM, NullVector said:

I'm paranoid about jumping to an incorrect conclusion before all the facts are in, so I'm extremely indecisive - even in terms of really trivial matters like picking a restaurant to eat in, for example! (much safer to defer that decision to somebody else so that I can't be blamed for any catastrophic outcomes :D)

I'm the same until I grow so sick of this tendency that I just impulsively make a decision. Does this count as free will?

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6 hours ago, DeltaV said:

I'm the same until I grow so sick of this tendency that I just impulsively make a decision. Does this count as free will?

 

Well, again, what's your definition of 'free will' here? :P 

From the context, it seems to be something along the lines of: I made a descision but I'm not sure why I made that particular one. But maybe calling that a "free" decision is a bit of an abuse of language - ignorance of external causes determining your actions doesn't imply the lack of such causes. Spinoza says something like this in The Ethics:

 

Quote

Men are mistaken in thinking themselves free; their opinion is made up of consciousness of their own actions, and ignorance of the causes by which they are conditioned. Their idea of freedom, therefore, is simply their ignorance of any cause for their actions. As for their saying that human actions depend on the will, this is a mere phrase without any idea to correspond thereto. What the will is, and how it moves the body, they none of them know; those who boast of such knowledge, and feign dwellings and habitations for the soul, are wont to provoke either laughter or disgust.

 

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On 5/11/2017 at 11:49 PM, NullVector said:

Well, again, what's your definition of 'free will' here? :P 

From the context, it seems to be something along the lines of: I made a descision but I'm not sure why I made that particular one. But maybe calling that a "free" decision is a bit of an abuse of language - ignorance of external causes determining your actions doesn't imply the lack of such causes.

What are causes? If we go back to medieval philosophers, free will wasn't conceived of being free of causes, it was just dependent on different causes than of the sort used in modern science (which are most closely related to Aristotle's efficient causes, though Aristotle is talking about agents not events). For example, for Thomas Aquinas the will always chooses what the intellect perceives as the highest good. So it is determined by final causality, though it is free from efficient causality.

 

For John Duns Scotus the will is also directed at the good (one's own good and then also the good of others): it cannot will pure misery for its own sake. But it is also relatively free from final causality because it can fail to will what is perceived as good or choose what is perceived as the lesser good. The will is the only thing in the world whose nature doesn't determine its operations under identical circumstances. It goes so far that though in the present instant of time, what is the case (Duns Scotus believes) is necessarily the case (it is necessary that at exactly this instant of time the color of the Golden Gate Bridge is orange. Since it is orange now, it couldn't be black now), this is not true for the will.

On 5/11/2017 at 11:49 PM, NullVector said:

Spinoza says something like this in The Ethics:

 

Quote

Men are mistaken in thinking themselves free; their opinion is made up of consciousness of their own actions, and ignorance of the causes by which they are conditioned. Their idea of freedom, therefore, is simply their ignorance of any cause for their actions. As for their saying that human actions depend on the will, this is a mere phrase without any idea to correspond thereto. What the will is, and how it moves the body, they none of them know; those who boast of such knowledge, and feign dwellings and habitations for the soul, are wont to provoke either laughter or disgust.

 

I would agree that the concept of free will is thoroughly confused, but is this a decisive argument against its existence? As mentioned before, the concept of probability is pretty confused, too. All the interpretations (classical, Bayesian, frequentist, propensity, ...) have serious issues and one could even use other axioms than Kolmogorov's for a useful probability theory. But does the fact that nobody really knows what probability is, justify to think that all talk of probabilities is completely flawed?

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On 2/17/2017 at 0:08 PM, Mark said:

I gave this a try but couldn't get it to produce results due to no suitable gender option.

I don't think the gender you choose affects the results. Do you want to just pick at random? 

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I never get consistent/definitive results on MBTI, so I'll just say E/I N/S T/F P/J. 

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INFJ, though it's probably closer to I-SOMETHING since I usually get between 40-60% for the other 3 traits. Once I scored a perfect 50 on the F/T scale.

 

For Big Five though:

 

Openness: 68%

Conscientiousness: 63%

Extraversion: 35%

Agreeable: 68%

Neuroticism: 60%

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On 12/02/2017 at 8:43 AM, Holmbo said:

Team extroverts!

ENF P/J OVER HERE :D

I got pretty much 97% on the E.. Lord of the Es :arocapapo:

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I like extroverts. They give me something to tall about instead of sitting in a corner on my own. 

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2 hours ago, Momo said:

I like extroverts. They give me something to tall about instead of sitting in a corner on my own. 

Yeah :) I always make a point to talk to quiet people as usually I find they're just unsure of how to start a conversation, then when you get them talking they're fine

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11 minutes ago, SamwiseLovesLife said:

I find they're just unsure of how to start a conversation

 

Or unable. Anxiety is a fun thing to have.

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On ‎2016‎-‎07‎-‎14 at 11:02 PM, Louis Hypo said:

INTP

When I was reading about being INTP there was a section on love and relationships and I thought `ha no thanks!`

I am too and when I got to that part I was like 'this should be good' and it actually said some pretty accurate stuff, like how we're distant, not too attached or jealous and stuff.  i'm like, 'yeah, well, that's...not...false'.  overall I found the whole analysis quite accurate, and so did my dad (he's the same), despite us being different in some ways.

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From reading a book called, "Was That Really Me?" by Naomi L. Quenk, I'm torn between INTP and ISTP

Edit: On the 16personalities test, I often get INTJ, INTP, and ISTJ (IxTx seems to be the only thing consistent)

Edited by Arostar

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On 7/17/2016 at 7:02 AM, aussiekirkland said:

I guess I'm the only INFJ here? Figures, as it is the rarest type. I'm a fan of MBTI, it has the fun of astrology but with accuracy. I've done the test a couple of times over the years and have gotten the same result every time so I'm pretty confident with it (the analysis are also very accurate, since my I and N bars are very strong in the test results)

I'm also an INFJ! We out here lol!!!

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