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I have extreme levels of paranoia, that lead to sleepless nights because I have a fear of someone robbing my home. I am very unsociable and isolationist with my life style as well. I do not consider it a disability though. I also may or may not be a sociopath, though I have never been properly diagnosed. 

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I have:

  • Autism
  • Cronical pain
  • Dyscalculia
  • and some Anxiouty

I am not very open about the last one because of shame.

The other parts I tell when they come up but I am also abit carefull because often I get in such a bad mood while explaining to people who just think that "oh you dont really have any problems we all feel like that" type of mentality or people who in general talk bad about people with my disabilities.

 

 

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On 6/29/2016 at 1:42 AM, Rising Sun said:

 

  Reveal hidden contents

 

  • I'm diagnosed with a rare neurological disorder with dyspraxia, ADD and sensory issues that shares almost all symptoms with autism but that isn't technically autism. (I won't say the name and enter into details because I could easily be identified on Internet this way) For this reason, I was a very bad student and now I live on disability, although I hope to get a job one day.
  • I have chronic migraines.
  • I'm an extreme night owl. Really, really extreme. I often see dawn before I fall asleep, even in Winter. I'm much more performant at night than during the day, and I would make a very bad day shift worker. It was terrible when I was a student. I have to take melatonin daily if I want to force my circadian cycle for a while. I'm not the only one in the family with that weird cycle.
  • I suffered from social anxiety disorder before (gone much better now) and I still have a few specific phobias. Complex PTSD with the nightmares and panic attacks (thanks mum for this).
  • I have low blood pressure. I take midodrine for that, it works fine.
  • I took paroxetine for my social anxiety disorder, and after one year of very hard withdrawal, I've suffered from SSRI discontinuation syndrome for 4 years now. Hello crying for nothing, brain zaps and memory loss, hands shaking like crazy...
  • My hormones are weird. I took cyproterone during many years, and I have to take levothyroxine too.
  • I suffer from gluten intolerance, certainly coeliac, very strongly suspected by both doctors and me because of severe digestive symptoms and malabsorption but which can't be officially diagnosed because I can't bear a 3-month gluten challenge before the biopsy.
  • I'm also diagnosed with pancreatitis attacks, apparently related to the gluten intolerance because these two started at the same time, just after gallbladder surgery, but no one knows the exact cause (CT scans don't show where it comes from). It's the most painful thing that I've ever known by far, it's pure horror (and I've known quite a few very painful things, but pancreatitis makes anything else feel like little scratches in comparison) to the point where morphine doesn't do much against the pain, it even makes my attacks worse.

 

 

 

 

 

Wow, now I sound like a complete hypochondriac now xD

 

@Sentient Android Synesthesia can be a disability, when it's extreme. That type is rare but it can also be a symptom of disabling neurological disorders and even cause some kind of sensory overload.

 

Indeed—but my synesthesia isn't like that.

 

On 6/28/2016 at 8:35 AM, Jade said:

Woo synnie buddies! :D what types do you have?

 

Lots xD https://starkwafie.wordpress.com/my-synesthetic-experience/

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I would not consider myself disabled. I have some stuff I have to deal with, but they aren't that bad.

 

Yes, I have dyslexia, I need to read in larger print, and I like to select parts of the text or use a bookmark, or read in larger print. Yes, I have dyscalculia, but with a calculator I function perfectly well. Some people need glasses, I need calculators and bookmarks. Whatever.

I also have anxiety and several anxiety disorders (OCD, ICD), and SAD. My anxiety actually got me through school, high school and uni. It kind of runs in the family, and I have learned to live with them, they are under control. SAD is pretty easy to combat, I know I need to drink some St John's Worth tea in the winter, get some vitamin B and D, magnesium and sunlight.

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Never really diagnosed with anything mentally. I was in counselling a while ago for depression related things (they never diagnosed me, but I was on meds for a while - had really bad side effects though, anxiety and stuff). Stopped going but might try to get therapy soon as it's kinda creeping back up, I suspect a few other things as well. But I'm under 18 and getting therapy at this point is a freaking joke, basically easier to wait till I'm 18.

@Sentient Android I've also most certainly got misophonia, it basically caused the entire depression thing, and a bit of noise triggers some bad thoughts.. I struggle a lot (especially when I'm in my room) with just people talking and the TV and most things, really. I have to listen to music to block it out. This kinda causes issues, like my friend will send me a video or something but I can't watch it as I'm listening to music, and if I turn the music off I can hear exterior noises so.. yeah.

Also can't stand eating noises and wrists cracking. My brother eats really loud and cracks his wrists loads (like sometimes, every 5 minutes, no that is not exaggerating) so I really struggle to be around him (thankfully he's at uni most the year around).

It's kind of gotten both worse and better over the few years, I think? There's generally more things which annoy me but I've gotten better at coping with it.

 

I sort of get sensory overload with lots of noise (quite a problem at college) or if somebody's sitting too close to me, and I'll "shut down", can't concentrate or think straight, don't want to talk to anyone.. but I'm not really sure.

 

Physically nothing major, I've got asthma which is usually fine (bad if I'm exercising but... I don't do that :P) although it's mainly triggered by allergies, so summer is hell, I'll often wake up at 3am slightly struggling to breathe.

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23 hours ago, Simowl said:

 

@Sentient Android I've also most certainly got misophonia, it basically caused the entire depression thing, and a bit of noise triggers some bad thoughts.. I struggle a lot (especially when I'm in my room) with just people talking and the TV and most things, really. I have to listen to music to block it out. This kinda causes issues, like my friend will send me a video or something but I can't watch it as I'm listening to music, and if I turn the music off I can hear exterior noises so.. yeah.

Also can't stand eating noises and wrists cracking. My brother eats really loud and cracks his wrists loads (like sometimes, every 5 minutes, no that is not exaggerating) so I really struggle to be around him (thankfully he's at uni most the year around).

It's kind of gotten both worse and better over the few years, I think? There's generally more things which annoy me but I've gotten better at coping with it.

 

Interesting... my misophonia doesn't sound as bad as yours. I'm not exactly one to give you medical advice, but you might want to look into SPD (sensory processing disorder).

 

Also... I think you'd hate being around me because I crack my knuckles/wrists obsessively all the time:|:P

 

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Just came to this thread to have a little rant I guess, I am getting super sick of the spontanious games of 20 questions. Luckily my mum, who I am staying with, is an extrovert and is a champion at fielding the questions, so I don't have to answer the questions of people I can;t even see. Sill doesn;t stop her asking some of the most annoying herself. I still have to deal with too many of them though.
 

"No I haven;t had eye surgery, I just can;t handle the light because of my migraine"


"Yes migraines are terrible, I am sorry to hear that you get them too, please continue describing what they are like, because I have only had mine for two and a half months and I may have missed something"


"Yes, it must be terrible to be 'properly blind', and of course I am grateful that this will pass and I won;t have permanent vision issues. No I promise I am not trying to belittle blind people"

 

"Yes I do actually know that when coming out of a dark room into the light it takes time to adjust, no that is not what is causing my extreme light sensitivity, yes I promise I can tell the difference."

"No, it hasn;t gone away and I just haven;t noticed, I am sure I would notice"

 

"Yes. Yes I can still see the aura with my eyes closed that's how it works"

"Yes using the computer does make it worse, but if I don't I may be prone to murdering someone from boredom and frustration."

"Yes I am glad that I don't get constant horrible pain from it, no that doesn;t actually make it okay, but thanks for saying it does."

 

"No, I can;t just take my mask off for a bit, although I am so sorry this is an inconvenience for you that I can;t see to move out of your way"

 

"What have I been up to lately? Oh, just sitting in a darkened room for 24 hours a day, or walking around with a mask on needing help with things and crashing into furniture people have moved, how about you?"

 

"No I haven;t actually been able to do any acting lately, but thanks for reminding me."
 

"No, it really wasn;t me you saw the other day, yes I know that they were wearing an eye patch. How do I know it wasn;t me? Well I was in an entirely different town. Yes, I am sure."

 

 

Well it feels good to get all that snark out of my system. I haven;t actually been saying this to them, I;ve just been breaking out the jokes, because that is the kind of person I am, and I can;t stand conflict.
Yes all of these are based on things people have said or strongly implied.

 

And then I get my own nagging doubts that maybe it is all in my head. Well, of course it is all in my head, it;s a migraine, it's a brain condition. My head is where it happens. But my anxiety is trying to convince me I am just making it up.

 

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Murphy's Bill passed. :(

This is one of those times I just have to be grateful to my psychiatrist for not wanting to formally diagnose me with schizophrenia and have it be on my permanent record.

And I'm so sad about how little publicity this is getting. This bill completely undermined the rights of those of us with SMIs and I'm not seeing anyone except for a few disability advocates talking about it. It passed with bipartisan support, some people are saying that it didn't go far enough, and I'm not seeing many people talking about it at all.

Tim Murphy, the one who passed the bill, said "current practices impede treatment for serious mental illness by emphasizing patients’ civil liberties ahead of their treatment."

I just... There's no words for how horrified and scared that sentence leaves me. No words.

 

Sending love to those of you here who are put in danger by this law. I hope things end up okay for you. <3 

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10 minutes ago, Jade said:

Murphy's Bill passed. :(

This is one of those times I just have to be grateful to my psychiatrist for not wanting to formally diagnose me with schizophrenia and have it be on my permanent record.

And I'm so sad about how little publicity this is getting. This bill completely undermined the rights of those of us with SMIs and I'm not seeing anyone except for a few disability advocates talking about it. It passed with bipartisan support, some people are saying that it didn't go far enough, and I'm not seeing many people talking about it at all.

Tim Murphy, the one who passed the bill, said "current practices impede treatment for serious mental illness by emphasizing patients’ civil liberties ahead of their treatment."

I just... There's no words for how horrified and scared that sentence leaves me. No words.

 

Sending love to those of you here who are put in danger by this law. I hope things end up okay for you. <3 

I do not live in the US, and it's obvious my Google searches aren't turning up anything useful. I don't understand what this bill entails.

 

I hope you're safe!

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23 minutes ago, Dodgypotato said:

I do not live in the US, and it's obvious my Google searches aren't turning up anything useful. I don't understand what this bill entails.

 

I hope you're safe!

I am safe, actually, thankfully; as I mentioned, my psychiatrist doesn't put my SMIs (serious mental illnesses) on my permanent record. This safety will go away when I turn 17 and move away from my current psychiatrist, though; I have another two years of safety until I have to move out and change psychiatrists and lose my protection from institutionalization, and then I have to be very, very careful.

This bill allows our psychiatrists to tell anyone in our family about our diagnoses regardless of our age or desires for privacy, including people who are or were abusing us, people who we rely on for survival who may exploit us due to our diagnoses, and people who may talk publicly about our diagnoses even if we want them to remain private (potentially harming our chances of employment, safety, etc.). It provides more funding and hospital beds for institutions (the majority of which are abusive), allowing more people to be forced into them. It provides more ways and easier ways to force us into treatment via police or the legal system if we refuse it. While it also helps to begin establishing alternatives for institutionalization (by increasing funding for outpatient treatment) it still does so nonconsensually, with high potential for abuse.

It's not really being talked about, which is why it's not showing up on google, but this is a huge loss of rights for us. While we were already at risk of being forcibly institutionalized, this makes it much easier to do so, allows for more ways to force us into treatment, and removes all of our rights to confidentiality. Not only this, but the lack of publicity means that a lot of people will be unaware of the increased risks and therefore won't know to take safety measures until it's too late.

 

I hope everyone else here is safe as well. This is a very sad day for those of us in the US with SMIs, especially those of us who are at high abuse risks.

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15 minutes ago, Jade said:

I am safe, actually, thankfully; as I mentioned, my psychiatrist doesn't put my SMIs (serious mental illnesses) on my permanent record. This safety will go away when I turn 17 and move away from my current psychiatrist, though; I have another two years of safety until I have to move out and change psychiatrists and lose my protection from institutionalization, and then I have to be very, very careful.

This bill allows our psychiatrists to tell anyone in our family about our diagnoses regardless of our age or desires for privacy, including people who are or were abusing us. It provides more funding and hospital beds for institutions (the majority of which are abusive). It provides more ways and easier ways to force us into treatment via police or the legal system if we refuse it. While it also helps to begin establishing alternatives for institutionalization (by increasing funding for outpatient treatment) it still does so nonconsensually, with high potential for abuse.

 

I hope everyone else here is safe as well.

Well f***, that's horrifying. It sounds like the kinds of things that would make my case much worse.

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14 minutes ago, Jade said:

I am safe, actually, thankfully; as I mentioned, my psychiatrist doesn't put my SMIs (serious mental illnesses) on my permanent record. This safety will go away when I turn 17 and move away from my current psychiatrist, though; I have another two years of safety until I have to move out and change psychiatrists and lose my protection from institutionalization, and then I have to be very, very careful.

This bill allows our psychiatrists to tell anyone in our family about our diagnoses regardless of our age or desires for privacy, including people who are or were abusing us, people who we rely on for survival who may exploit us due to our diagnoses, and people who may talk publicly about our diagnoses even if we want them to remain private (potentially harming our chances of employment, safety, etc.). It provides more funding and hospital beds for institutions (the majority of which are abusive), allowing more people to be forced into them. It provides more ways and easier ways to force us into treatment via police or the legal system if we refuse it. While it also helps to begin establishing alternatives for institutionalization (by increasing funding for outpatient treatment) it still does so nonconsensually, with high potential for abuse.

It's not really being talked about, which is why it's not showing up on google, but this is a huge loss of rights for us. While we were already at risk of being forcibly institutionalized, this makes it much easier to do so, allows for more ways to force us into treatment, and removes all of our rights to confidentiality.

 

I hope everyone else here is safe as well. This is a very sad day for those of us in the US with SMIs, especially those of us who are at high abuse risks.

Ouch, I am so sorry @Jadeand anyone else in the USA, I can't believe that no one is talking about this, or sees it as a problem!!! Further proof I guess that the general public don;t see people with disabilities as people. Thanks for explaining that for those of us from overseas. Here privacy is a definate right, for everyone so far as I know, to the point where it can get a little ridiculous, like you can;t just tell them it;s okay to talk to a certain person, you have to fill out lots of forms. I will never complain about that again. 

It is so counterproductive to make the most vulnerable people legitimately afraid to seek help. 
I am glad you are safe for now, and I am sorry that safety will not be assured in the future,
Hugs if you want :(

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Update: Murphy's Bill is not actually law yet. It still has to go to committee and then pass by the president. While it most likely will pass, it hasn't fully passed everything yet, thank god, my initial post was inaccurate, and there's still a chance it won't pass.

There's still some hope, at least. I really hope that it doesn't pass and everyone gets through this ok, but even if it does pass, I'll still be here for everyone who's in danger because of this bill <3

 

Here is another post about the dangers of the bill, for those of you who want more information.

 

@Ace-TheTimelordsCompanion thank you so much for the hugs, it really does mean a lot to me :hugs:

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Oh jeez, this is the first time I've heard about Murphy's Bill and I live in the US. This is pretty scary; my plan was to seek therapy when I was old enough to drive so I didn't have to go through my family. I'm not really sure whether that's a good idea now :/

 

I'll share this with my oldest sister, that's one person who is bound to see how messed up this is.

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Asperger's... I thinks that's it.

I've always blamed the straying from social norms as Asperger's but I've started asking how much of that is me and how much is not the all purpose label that's opened a world of special treatment and free passes. Problem is it seems like the best definition is "autism but not staring at the ceiling and being the shy kid who might bring in a weapon" (which is dumb because one shy kid brings in a weapon and suddenly they're all dangerous according to this) and don't get me started on people getting fussed over words. In short: impairment doesn't sound and better than disability but handicap does have a genuinely discriminatory root so don't use it. Can we leave it at that?

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I totally forgot about the existence of this thread until @Jade posted about it, and recent months have demonstrated that I probably qualify for posting here. I don't even know...I probably have things? Definitely anxiety and depression, if we're counting those, and possibly some sort of autismy thing and sensory overload thing as well? Though those seem somewhat more recent (at least in terms of the major things that have made me suspect I have them), only within the past year or two, which is why they're hesitant self-diagnoses and not something I've actually seen anyone about because I have neither the time nor the energy for that. I've only recently come to realize that there's a difference between just being moderately tired due to consistent academic stress and "I cannot handle anything more mentally or physically strenuous than lying on the floor for at least an hour after every time I leave my dorm room and would rather just not eat than deal with the high levels of noise and overcrowding and forced social interaction in the dining hall". That doesn't happen all the time, but it's definitely been a consistent enough thing that I've finally noticed that it's probably an indication of some sort of brainweird.

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Just want to let everyone know that anxiety and depression do, in fact, count as disabilities. Also: people who are questioning whether or not they have disabilities are 1000% welcome. This thread is inclusive for all disabilities! :) To anyone who thinks it doesn't count: please, consider the fact that, according to the research on DALYs, severe depression is more disabling than all other mental disabilities except for at this moment being psychotic. :P  Us disabled people deal with a lot of invalidation, both from others and ourselves; this thread will not reinforce any of that.

 

A rule of thumb: If you're asking yourself, "am I disabled enough to post in this thread?" then the answer is yes.

 

Also, an update on the Murphy Bill-- it is still in the Senate, and it hasn't passed yet!

 

Anyway, with that out of the way; Dodec, that deeefinitely sounds like a sign of brainweird. That level of overload and lack of energy is just not something that would be common in abled people/NTs. Also, it sucks that you've been dealing with that; it definitely does not sound fun. I hope you can figure something out to make your life a bit more manageable to handle! :hugs:

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I felt like asking. does anyone feel its more difficult comming out as aro when you are disable?

 

I feel that since people with disabilities tend to be desexualised and deromantizised that in one way it can be "expected from us that we are aro or ace, but on the other hand people may just think we are so due to the disability or we are holding ourself back because of it?

 

also specially those with mental disabilities or illness may get told this is just a part of that. 

 

IDK but I feel its kinda difficult being open about being both aro and autistic because I feel that as an autistic person im not expected to feel "love" anyway since they say we cant fell empathy and we cant understand humans emotions and so on so (which is rubbish btw). 

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I'm in an annoying place - last year I got a GP referral for autism (mostly Asperger's). Apparently I'm just on the border where I have enough of the traits of Asperger's to almost qualify as autistic, but not enough to warrant funding for further tests. I just took this test (again, with more thought than last time) and got this result:

 

URkBvjB.png

 

And I probably have (very) mild social phobia according to the NHS definition, particularly when it comes to phone calls to strangers and meeting groups of strangers.

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29 minutes ago, Kaiger Pufflehugs IV said:

I'm in an annoying place - last year I got a GP referral for autism (mostly Asperger's). Apparently I'm just on the border where I have enough of the traits of Asperger's to almost qualify as autistic, but not enough to warrant funding for further tests. I just took this test (again, with more thought than last time) and got this result:

  Reveal hidden contents

URkBvjB.png

 

And I probably have (very) mild social phobia according to the NHS definition, particularly when it comes to phone calls to strangers and meeting groups of strangers.

All those aspie quizzes made go to into a pretty deep depression when I was about 15. I got out of it without seeing a doctor and now I'm pretty certain that I don't have higher functioning autism (that's what they call it now right?). I show a lot of the traits of it, but I don't see any point in going to see a doctor about it. And anyway, my mum has a degree in teaching kids with autism. If she doesn't think I have autism, I probably don't have autism. If I were you, I wouldn't sweat it.

 

If you're wondering, here's my result on the test which was linked.



US2Qq6n.png

 

I have a tendency to over-think things to the point where I don't even know if my thoughts are my own.

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13 minutes ago, Zemaddog said:

If I were you, I wouldn't sweat it.

Don't worry, I'm not really too bothered about it. More curious and conscious that I have the traits.

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22 hours ago, Natkat said:

I feel that since people with disabilities tend to be desexualised and deromantizised that in one way it can be "expected from us that we are aro or ace, but on the other hand people may just think we are so due to the disability or we are holding ourself back because of it?

I'm a little surprised that this hasn't been brought up before. Given that assuming disabled people to be asexual (and aromantic) due to infantisation is a fairly well known issue.
N.B. those who do this, be they members of the public or "medical professionals" are unlikely to have any idea of the concept of variorientation.

 

IMHO what is likely to be more of an issue is that aros often want to form relationships which are non-romantic (and non-normative). Something which can be difficult for anyone living in a society where such things are rather taboo.

 

22 hours ago, Natkat said:

IDK but I feel its kinda difficult being open about being both aro and autistic because I feel that as an autistic person im not expected to feel "love" anyway since they say we cant fell empathy and we cant understand humans emotions and so on so (which is rubbish btw). 

Even though being aromantic is more common amongst autistic (possibly neuro-diverse in general) people than amongst neuro typical people it's still a minority situation. Even in the "autistic community" I find myself to be one aromantic amongst many alloromantics. It's in aro, solo poly and relationship anarchy spaces that I'm most likely to feel having things in common.

There's also the fundermental of problem of lack of awareness that romantic orientations exist (and that they can differ from sexual orientations).

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this monday, I was at this disability mentorship day with comcast, it was the first time they were doing it so they were all nervous and we were kinda nervous too. but, it went great! I felt very at-home, I was there with a small group of other people with aspergers/autism spectrum stuff goin on for them. IDK how much I showed it, but one of them was having difficult with eye contact and i thought to myself. omg I sooo uderstand what he's going through right now :( and another one, was very talkative, in a way that i was like, heh, he's just like how i am sometimes. was super affirming for me to be there. plus, comcast did a fair enough job of doing a good set of presentations for the audience, and the helpers/mentors seemed to be very great at being helpful and accomodating. and none of the leaders/mentors/helpers were awkward about anything, unlike, for example, my mom, lol :( (at least she is accepting)

 

oh, btw. hello! I have autism. it slips just under the radar for most of my life, but f'd me up when I started living on my own and working. I'm trying to learn how to manage my setbacks, but that means I'm unemployed, but idk. I've made a lot of improvements this past few years. 

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1 hour ago, Mark said:

Even though being aromantic is more common amongst autistic (possibly neuro-diverse in general) people than amongst neuro typical people it's still a minority situation. Even in the "autistic community" I find myself to be one aromantic amongst many alloromantics. It's in aro, solo poly and relationship anarchy spaces that I'm most likely to feel having things in common.

2

I tend to feel too queer for the autistic comunity and too autistic for the lgbt comunity. -__-

 

1 hour ago, cute kitty Meow! Mewo! said:

this monday, I was at this disability mentorship day with comcast, it was the first time they were doing it so they were all nervous and we were kinda nervous too. but, it went great! I felt very at-home, I was there with a small group of other people with aspergers/autism spectrum stuff goin on for them. IDK how much I showed it, but one of them was having difficult with eye contact and i thought to myself. omg I sooo uderstand what he's going through right now :( and another one, was very talkative, in a way that i was like, heh, he's just like how i am sometimes. was super affirming for me to be there. plus, comcast did a fair enough job of doing a good set of presentations for the audience, and the helpers/mentors seemed to be very great at being helpful and accomodating. and none of the leaders/mentors/helpers were awkward about anything, unlike, for example, my mom, lol :( (at least she is accepting)

 

oh, btw. hello! I have autism. it slips just under the radar for most of my life, but f'd me up when I started living on my own and working. I'm trying to learn how to manage my setbacks, but that means I'm unemployed, but idk. I've made a lot of improvements this past few years. 

16

 

oh congratuation on going your first time^^

 

I grew up in an all autistic school so I dont know how it feels to be in the situation on meeting other autistic like that for the first time, but I can imagine it being really important. 

the cool thing when you hang around other autistic people is you dont have to mind the autistic traits other seams to be bothered about. like I HATE eye contact.

I get comments on my school I school that I should do more eye contact or that it will even hurt my grades if I dont do enough eye contact during the exame, not to mention the 10.000 times people get angry at me for not looking at them. When im around my autistic friend I never get these comments.

 

 

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I definitely condone doing whats comfortable! if anyone doesn't want eye contact then they shouldn't have too. I felt bad because, the way that I sat down, the guy had to shift in his seat, I wish I'd figured out to shift my own body angle before i forced him too, sigh.

 

 we all have different experiences. I've been purposefully trying to make more eye contact, like over the past several years, and I can actually do it in conversation now. it makes me kind of sad tho, how much more people are smiley and energetic when I'm looking them in the eye regularly during a conversation. that shouldn't have to be a required thing at all. I should have had to even bothered learning to tolerate eye contact, I always liked not having to look people in the eye tbh. 

 

 

I guess what i'd do is, I'd first look people in the eye briefly as I finished a thought, as if to pass the baton to them, or as if to affirm their emotional reaction to my idea. it was weird but after awhile it was habit. and from there I forget how I did it, and I wouldn't say I'm 100% comfortable with eye contact, I am actually uncomfortable with it, but I'd move from there. 

 

that's what I did and it helped. and like I said, if you don't like eye contact then all power to you. tbh, it makes me happy that you were able to be in a good school environment :) and, I feel like, considering what they say about google's work environment, and considering the various job placement groups, and the mentorship program, I feel very positive right now about people being able to get in healthy environments. 

 

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