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aihpen

Can cis people feel dysphoria?

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All the time I read about how not all trans people feel dysphoria, but I never see anything about the other way around. Are all people who feel dysphoria trans? Are there cis people who feel dysphoria? I've been wondering about this for a while now and I'm actually surprised that it somehow never gets mentioned. Maybe the answer to this is very obvious, but as almost anything that has to do with gender, I am completely clueless.

Anyone has answers for me? It would be highly appreciated ^_^

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By definition, cis people cannot experience gender dysphoria. That being said, not all dysphoria is gender related. Dysphoria is just a term used to describe a general dissatisfaction with life. That would mean that depression is a form of dysphoria.

 

I think cis people could also experience body dysphoria, as long as it's not related to feeling like the wrong gender. There are probably some people who are unhappy with their body weight and this is independent of gender. I am unsure as to whether this body dysphoria can be inherent, or whether it is always due to societal pressures and expectations.

 

But, my main point is that not all dysphoria is gender related, and certain mental illnesses can be classified as dysphoria, regardless of whether the person is cis or trans.

 

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I get what @Zemaddog is saying about non gender related body dysphoria as I have experienced it myself (as a result of societal pressure, which went away after I lost weight). I also feel like I've experienced gender dysphoria, but when I left school the problems went away so the dysphoria went away, which led me to believe I'm cis. Is that wrong?

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@Zemaddog That makes sense, but that leads me to the question where the (maybe blurry) line between gender and body dysphoria is. If you feel dysphoria about having for example an afab body, but don't really care if others see you as a female or anything else, is that body dysphoria? Or gender dysphoria? Does gender dysphoria always include a social aspect like what pronouns people use and being perceived as a certain gender?

 

 

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19 hours ago, aussiekirkland said:

I also feel like I've experienced gender dysphoria, but when I left school the problems went away so the dysphoria went away, which led me to believe I'm cis. Is that wrong?

That is entirely up to you.

 

14 hours ago, aihpen said:

@Zemaddog That makes sense, but that leads me to the question where the (maybe blurry) line between gender and body dysphoria is. If you feel dysphoria about having for example an afab body, but don't really care if others see you as a female or anything else, is that body dysphoria? Or gender dysphoria? Does gender dysphoria always include a social aspect like what pronouns people use and being perceived as a certain gender?

There are different types of gender dysphoria. The ones I'm most familiar with are body and social dysphoria, although there's probably others. If you experience dysphoria about having an AFAB body I'd say that it's gender dysphoria, but more specifically body dysphoria. Most of my dysphoria is body related. I'm not out to anyone IRL so everyone sees me as male and I just accept that people will refer to me as such. The only circumstances where it hurts is when someone expects certain things from me because I'm male. At the moment people keep saying I need a haircut and I'm just sick of it.

 

Also, don't think I'm an expert on this subject. I'm really not.

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On 10/1/2016 at 9:01 PM, Zemaddog said:

By definition, cis people cannot experience gender dysphoria. That being said, not all dysphoria is gender related. Dysphoria is just a term used to describe a general dissatisfaction with life. That would mean that depression is a form of dysphoria.

 

I think cis people could also experience body dysphoria, as long as it's not related to feeling like the wrong gender. There are probably some people who are unhappy with their body weight and this is independent of gender. I am unsure as to whether this body dysphoria can be inherent, or whether it is always due to societal pressures and expectations.

 

But, my main point is that not all dysphoria is gender related, and certain mental illnesses can be classified as dysphoria, regardless of whether the person is cis or trans.

(waves) cis person with non-gender dysphoria here! This is a bit unrelated to the main point at hand, but I'm going to throw myself and my experiences out there as a cis person with dysphoria, both body and mental illness related. Depression, dissociation, personality disorder problems, anxiety... And then of course there's the fact that I used to have an eating disorder and was kinda-sorta-not-really body dysmorphic. I don't feel that any of this is necessarily related to societal pressures so much as it is my own issues, but I know a lot of people with dysphoria who do have it due to society's expectations.

 

But the most weird example of dysphoria I have is species dysphoria (don't laugh). My brain sees my "correct body" as being a cat, gets very (irrationally) upset about being human-shaped and not covered in fur (fun fact: I, a cis girl, have considered going on T for the sake of increased body hair!), not able to walk naturally on four legs, etc., to the point of self-harm and depression. V describes it well in xer post here (xe, unlike me, is trans, and has both gender dysphoria and species dysphoria). And knowing that there is nothing I can do that will change my body enough to make it mine... It's soul-crushing. I would do anything for that. But it's impossible, so I just have to kind of learn to live with my dysphoria the best I can. Which sucks, but hey, grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change and all that jazz.

 

So, yeah. Dysphoric but cis: it's a thing.

 

To refer to the original point (I'm cis so feel free to ignore my advice here, heh, but I did my best):

What's helped me and some of my friends the most is this: when you're confused, focus on what you want (for example, someone might want to bind and go on T but be referred to with she/her pronouns; or maybe they'll want to use they/them and get bottom surgery without going on hormones or getting top surgery; or any other combination. transition isn't all-or-nothing) whether than What You/Your Experiences Truly Are Deep Down (the people mentioned above might identify as gender-non-conforming cis women, non-binary people, trans men, none of the above... whatever feels right to them). Live the life that will make you most happy; labels describe what you want to do, they don't decide it for you. If you're dysphoric and confused, figure out how you want to deal with that (therapy, body positivity, changing your location/friends, makeup, surgery, medication, hormones, exercise, etc etc, whatever you think will help you) first; if you're unsure what the right labels for you are, that's okay, you have your whole life to question them, but wouldn't it be nice to do that in a body that feels like it's yours?

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17 hours ago, Zemaddog said:

There are different types of gender dysphoria. The ones I'm most familiar with are body and social dysphoria, although there's probably others. If you experience dysphoria about having an AFAB body I'd say that it's gender dysphoria, but more specifically body dysphoria. Most of my dysphoria is body related. I'm not out to anyone IRL so everyone sees me as male and I just accept that people will refer to me as such. The only circumstances where it hurts is when someone expects certain things from me because I'm male. At the moment people keep saying I need a haircut and I'm just sick of it.

 

Also, don't think I'm an expert on this subject. I'm really not.

This describes pretty well how I feel. I'm really not bothered by being called female, but when people try to tell me to do certain things or act in certain ways etc. just because I'm considered a female, then that is honestly very annoying. But having a female body sucks. Well as a child it was fine, but then puberty came...

Also, I don't expect anyone to be an expert on this subject, but sometimes talking to other people about something I don't understand on my own helps a lot (no matter how much they know about the subject, sometimes people don't know anything and then their stupid questions get me further )

 

4 hours ago, Jade said:

To refer to the original point (I'm cis so feel free to ignore my advice here, heh, but I did my best):

What's helped me and some of my friends the most is this: when you're confused, focus on what you want (for example, someone might want to bind and go on T but be referred to with she/her pronouns; or maybe they'll want to use they/them and get bottom surgery without going on hormones or getting top surgery; or any other combination. transition isn't all-or-nothing) whether than What You/Your Experiences Truly Are Deep Down (the people mentioned above might identify as gender-non-conforming cis women, non-binary people, trans men, none of the above... whatever feels right to them). Live the life that will make you most happy; labels describe what you want to do, they don't decide it for you. If you're dysphoric and confused, figure out how you want to deal with that (therapy, body positivity, changing your location/friends, makeup, surgery, medication, hormones, exercise, etc etc, whatever you think will help you) first; if you're unsure what the right labels for you are, that's okay, you have your whole life to question them, but wouldn't it be nice to do that in a body that feels like it's yours?

That's exactly what I was planning to do. I don't really care about labeling myself. I don't care whether I'm cis or whatever. Because I know what I want and probably wouldn't tell people anyway. The questions I asked were out of pure curiosity and because my mind keeps wandering there

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Okay, I'm a mental health major and sociology nerd, there's a chapter on gender in my psych textbook, and I'm a dysphoric nonbinary person whose first binder should arrive within about three weeks. When people are uncomfortable with expectations to be feminine or masculine, that's called gender role strain. And if they want to do something like bind, take hormones, get surgery, use different pronouns, if they're uncomfortable with people seeing them as strictly male/female, if they want to use a gender ambiguous nickname...well, they might want to look into whether they're actually cis.

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9 hours ago, Miles said:

When people are uncomfortable with expectations to be feminine or masculine, that's called gender role strain. And if they want to do something like bind, take hormones, get surgery, use different pronouns, if they're uncomfortable with people seeing them as strictly male/female, if they want to use a gender ambiguous nickname...well, they might want to look into whether they're actually cis.

This makes so much sense, thank you for explaining! I never understood what made someone nonbinary rather than cis but now I think I understand better.

 

I definitely get gender role strain and I feel it almost daily, but I don't experience the other things you mentioned (I have a gender neutral nickname but I've been using it my whole life) so that would make me a cis woman.

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well, there is something that most people experience, that some days they feel more gendered and other days less gendered. or whatever. maybe saying feel more gendered isn't the universal way of describing feeling shame, or something, over a gender-related attribute or expectation.

 

if a cis woman one day, didn't feel woman enough, would that be gender dysphoria? it wouldn't be the extent to which gender dysphoria can be painful, sure. but is it not still dysphoria regarding gender? I would say that any man who's question his manhood and any woman who hasn't felt pretty enough has felt a small level of gender dysphoria. what about a woman who feels like she's not noticed because of her gender? and wishes she were a dude just so that she could be successful. couldn't you even say that a man who wants to look pretty, but feels like he can't because he's a dude, has experienced gender dysphoria, even though he is a cis dude?

 

I find it hard to imagine a trans person who hasn't experienced gender dysphoria in their life, but when you take a step back and ask what gender dysphoria can be, no it  isn't something that is only experienced by trans people. 

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On 27.10.2016 at 10:08 PM, Miles said:

Okay, I'm a mental health major and sociology nerd, there's a chapter on gender in my psych textbook, and I'm a dysphoric nonbinary person whose first binder should arrive within about three weeks. When people are uncomfortable with expectations to be feminine or masculine, that's called gender role strain. And if they want to do something like bind, take hormones, get surgery, use different pronouns, if they're uncomfortable with people seeing them as strictly male/female, if they want to use a gender ambiguous nickname...well, they might want to look into whether they're actually cis.

Okay I do get that gender role strain thing occasionally, but what made me wondering if I'm cis  were some of the other things you mentioned... I want to bind and surgery sounds tempting, but I'm scared of going to doctors because I've been to so many in my life and most of them were no help at all and some might have even made things worse than before, so I'm quite hesitant when it comes to something like a surgery... I've thought about hormones, but don't think it'd be worth it because while I'd like some aspects of it (like redistribution of fat in the body), I wouldn't like other parts (like facial hair) and I'm not quite sure how I'd feel about other aspects (like voice changes), so it would probably not make much sense. I don't care about pronouns to be honest and same with how people see me. Gender ambiguous nicknames are cool, but my name doesn't offer many nickname possibilities, but I think I'd really like that, at least I really like being called Pen here and on aven, which I'd say could be for any gender.

So if I'd want to follow what you said I should look into whether I'm actually cis... That's exactly what I'm trying to do, but none of that seems to get me any further with finding out. :rofl:

 

On 28.10.2016 at 5:03 PM, cute kitty Meow! Mewo! said:

well, there is something that most people experience, that some days they feel more gendered and other days less gendered. or whatever. maybe saying feel more gendered isn't the universal way of describing feeling shame, or something, over a gender-related attribute or expectation.

 

if a cis woman one day, didn't feel woman enough, would that be gender dysphoria? it wouldn't be the extent to which gender dysphoria can be painful, sure. but is it not still dysphoria regarding gender? I wosuld say that any man who's question his manhood and any woman who hasn't felt pretty enough has felt a small level of gender dysphoria. what about a woman who feels like she's not noticed because of her gender? and wishes she were a dude just so that she could be successful. couldn't you even say that a man who wants to look pretty, but feels like he can't because he's a dude, has experienced gender dysphoria, even though he is a cis dude?

 

I find it hard to imagine a trans person who hasn't experienced gender dysphoria in their life, but when you take a step back and ask what gender dysphoria can be, no it  isn't something that is only experienced by trans people. 

I guess that totally depends on how you define gender dysphoria. If you think of it as discomfort/unhappiness/distress caused by your sex/gender assigned at birth, it might be seen as gender dysphoria, but I also read definitions of gender dysphoria that add words like intense or strong to the definition in which case the examples you used might not be gender dysphoria.

That's why I don't understand any of this gender stuff, there are always either different definitions floating around the internet or the definitions are extremely vague... I honestly don't even care that much about finding a label for myself, knowing how I feel and how I want to act on those feelings is enough for me, but I like to do my best to understand other peoples identities :|

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I think I've experienced it very mildly in the past. I have fairly ample breasts and used to sometimes not be comfortable with having them at all, particularly when they were drawing unwanted male attention. I did used to fantasise about binding my chest up instead of wearing a bra, to minimise them (they're saggy when not contained, so it would have been uncomfortable for me to just not wear a bra, not to mention probably also obvious if I was only wearing a T shirt).

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You can definitely experience dysphoria if you are not trans. That being said, it's not possible to experience gender dysphoria, if you are cis. I get the feeling that a lot of people seem to forget that "dysphoria" is a strong psychological term to describe a symptom that accompanies anxiety, depression and other negative states of mind and significantly increases the risk for suicide in an individual. It's a strong word. Feeling uncomfortable with certain aspects of your body or your role in society is... well.... normal... Experiencing gender or body dysphoria is listed in the DSM-5. Remember, dysphoria is the opposite of euphoria, it's a negative feeling akin to a "bad high". That's why not all trans people have to feel gender dysphoria. It's a strong feeling that not everybody necessarily has to experience. If somebody knows what their gender is without having to feel this, that's a good thing and they aren't any less trans for it. 


Cis people can absolutely feel uncomfortable in their bodies, even towards typical gender markers also known as >>experiencing body dysphoria<< (for example you can feel dysphoria for your breast.), but gender dysphoria is a special kind of psychological stress that occurs if your gender identity doesn't match your assigned sex at birth. Soo, disliking your breasts can be a part of gender dysphoria, but it's not the whole thing. For gender dysphoria, you actually have to strongly identify with a gender that's not your bio-sex (the DSM says "the opposite sex", since it's a word used to describe trans experiences, but I'm including NBs). If you are genderflux, these feelings might come and go.


Dysphoria is the Umbrella Term. There is Social, Gender, Body etc. 
Body Dysphoria involves Dysphoria of the Body only (an example is the way people with eating disorders tend to view their bodies...) 

Gender Dysphoria has Social, Body and more types of Dysphoria under the subject: Gender Identity.

Here's a read on Gender Dysphoria and it's markers. 

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On 11/30/2016 at 8:09 PM, Untamed Heart said:

I think I've experienced it very mildly in the past. I have fairly ample breasts and used to sometimes not be comfortable with having them at all, particularly when they were drawing unwanted male attention. I did used to fantasise about binding my chest up instead of wearing a bra, to minimise them (they're saggy when not contained, so it would have been uncomfortable for me to just not wear a bra, not to mention probably also obvious if I was only wearing a T shirt).

 

Same here. I have actually considered getting surgery. Its not just the unwanted attention but also its inpractical, being inbetween sizes, not being able to move etc.

I am prefectly happy with being a woman, I just want to have a slightly different bodytype, to look smarter in clothes and be more comfortable in the gym.

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On 30.11.2016 at 11:12 PM, Kojote said:

You can definitely experience dysphoria if you are not trans. That being said, it's not possible to experience gender dysphoria, if you are cis. I get the feeling that a lot of people seem to forget that "dysphoria" is a strong psychological term to describe a symptom that accompanies anxiety, depression and other negative states of mind and significantly increases the risk for suicide in an individual. It's a strong word. Feeling uncomfortable with certain aspects of your body or your role in society is... well.... normal... Experiencing gender or body dysphoria is listed in the DSM-5. Remember, dysphoria is the opposite of euphoria, it's a negative feeling akin to a "bad high".

Thanks. This is what I was asking for ^_^

On 30.11.2016 at 11:12 PM, Kojote said:

Cis people can absolutely feel uncomfortable in their bodies, even towards typical gender markers also known as >>experiencing body dysphoria<< (for example you can feel dysphoria for your breast.), but gender dysphoria is a special kind of psychological stress that occurs if your gender identity doesn't match your assigned sex at birth. Soo, disliking your breasts can be a part of gender dysphoria, but it's not the whole thing. For gender dysphoria, you actually have to strongly identify with a gender that's not your bio-sex (the DSM says "the opposite sex", since it's a word used to describe trans experiences, but I'm including NBs).

I guess in that case I wouldn't feel gender dysphoria, but according to this:

On 30.11.2016 at 11:12 PM, Kojote said:

I would.... I guess that's what my problem is with all of this. There is a different description everywhere and it's so confusing

 

On 30.11.2016 at 9:09 PM, Untamed Heart said:

I think I've experienced it very mildly in the past. I have fairly ample breasts and used to sometimes not be comfortable with having them at all, particularly when they were drawing unwanted male attention. I did used to fantasise about binding my chest up instead of wearing a bra, to minimise them (they're saggy when not contained, so it would have been uncomfortable for me to just not wear a bra, not to mention probably also obvious if I was only wearing a T shirt).

On 2.12.2016 at 5:39 PM, Cassiopeia said:

Same here. I have actually considered getting surgery. Its not just the unwanted attention but also its inpractical, being inbetween sizes, not being able to move etc.

I am prefectly happy with being a woman, I just want to have a slightly different bodytype, to look smarter in clothes and be more comfortable in the gym.

I don't know if that could be called dysphoria though? Isn't that something many cis women feel? I don't know, I don't feel like I can answer that, I don't know enough about the topic. At least I don't think it would be gender dysphoria, since the reason why you feel that way doesn't really have something to do with gender, but more because it's physically uncomfortable? I don't know, I still don't understand anything :eyebrow:

 

What I get from all of your answers though is, that there is no clear line between what gender dysphoria is and what isn't. And depending on what you call gender dysphoria, the answer to my question differs too. I just hate to know that when someone says they experience gender dysphoria, it doesn't really tell me anything because people use that so differently... and honestly I don't think I ever will understand because there just isn't a 100% clear description and probably there will never be one because it's just not a simple enough topic to say that there is an exact point where gender dysphoria starts.

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50 minutes ago, aihpen said:
On 30.11.2016 at 11:12 PM, Kojote said:

I would.... I guess that's what my problem is with all of this. There is a different description everywhere and it's so confusing

When in doubt, go with this (Diagnostic criteria under Gender Dysphoria in Adolescents and Adults and Diagnostic Features ). These are the official markers for gender dysphoria used in the newest version of the DSM aka the DSM-V, which is a manual for diagnosing mental issues that were carefully discussed and agreed upon by mental health experts. Just remember that you have to qualify with at least 2 of the markers, they have to persist for more that 6 month and the issue has to follow this: " B. The condition is associated with clinically significant distress or impairment in social, occupational or other important areas of functioning.(aka strong shit is really a really strong thing)
to be diagnosed with dysphoria. (and well, reading the markers is a form of self-diagnosing you'd usually get diagnosed by a health expert after talking to them in sessions). 

Can I ask why you feel like you wouldn't "qualify" in my paraphrased definition vs. the article? I'm curious and I'd like to know where you draw the blurred line =) Maybe I used bad phrasing and that's why you feel that there's a difference.

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I guess in my case, I'm more of a tomboy than a very feminine person and wouldn't care if I'd been flat chested? I can see why it wouldn't be classed as gender dysphoria though. I'm comfortable in my body, because I've learned to accept myself more since I left school - not because "I'm a woman with conveniently nice feminine features", but I dislike uninvited male attention, at least if those men seem the type who just see women walking round town as pieces of meat. That's what makes me want to hide my breasts, but I would agree probably not dysphoria in a broader sense.

 

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8 hours ago, aihpen said:

I don't know if that could be called dysphoria though? Isn't that something many cis women feel? I don't know, I don't feel like I can answer that, I don't know enough about the topic. At least I don't think it would be gender dysphoria, since the reason why you feel that way doesn't really have something to do with gender, but more because it's physically uncomfortable? I don't know, I still don't understand anything :eyebrow:

 

I did not say I have gender dysphoria, and I'm sorry if it sounded insensitive. What I was -perhaps a bit awkwardly- trying to say is that I can relate to what @Untamed Heart describes there. I think its more than a simple insecurity, but I'm not sure how much of it is The Gaytm or perhaps a reaction to sexism and objectification. Who knows?

 

But we can agree, gender dysphoria would not be an appropriate term, at least not in my case, because as I said earlier, it is not a gender thing. 

 

Anyway, there is a thing called body dysmorphia, and it can fit the category of something similar to gender dysphoria but its not a gender issue or an ED.

(And no, this part is not really about me, just brain things in general)

 

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On 4.12.2016 at 3:29 PM, Kojote said:

Can I ask why you feel like you wouldn't "qualify" in my paraphrased definition vs. the article? I'm curious and I'd like to know where you draw the blurred line =) Maybe I used bad phrasing and that's why you feel that there's a difference.

Well the diagnostic criteria for gender dysphoria in adolescents and adults from the article use "experienced gender" where I'd say mine is different than my gender assigned at birth, but you said:

On 30.11.2016 at 11:12 PM, Kojote said:

you actually have to strongly identify with a gender that's not your bio-sex

and I wouldn't say I "strongly identify" with that gender. I also don't strongly identify with my assigned gender and also not with any other gender or even with not having one. I think I do have a gender and that that is different from my assigned one, but I wouldn't use "strongly identify" for that... I do feel strongly about the things that I think are caused by that gender, but the gender itself... I don't even feel the need to find a label for it, I just really like not identifying as anything whether that's a woman, a man, something inbetween, no gender at all or anything else, I don't think I want to identify even though I think I have a gender and that's not my assigned one? Does this somehow make sense?

 

22 hours ago, Untamed Heart said:

I guess in my case, I'm more of a tomboy than a very feminine person and wouldn't care if I'd been flat chested? I can see why it wouldn't be classed as gender dysphoria though. I'm comfortable in my body, because I've learned to accept myself more since I left school - not because "I'm a woman with conveniently nice feminine features", but I dislike uninvited male attention, at least if those men seem the type who just see women walking round town as pieces of meat. That's what makes me want to hide my breasts, but I would agree probably not dysphoria in a broader sense.

I'm not going to tell you if that's dysphoria or not, because I firstly don't feel like I know enough about this to tell you and also I can't look into your mind so I wouldn't know anyway. But I'd say if you feel like that about your body because of male attention, it doesn't seem to be gender dysphoria because it's not really caused by gender. If it would be dysphoria, then probably another not gender related form of body dysphoria? I really don't know, I'm no expert.

 

17 hours ago, Cassiopeia said:

I did not say I have gender dysphoria, and I'm sorry if it sounded insensitive. What I was -perhaps a bit awkwardly- trying to say is that I can relate to what @Untamed Heart describes there. I think its more than a simple insecurity, but I'm not sure how much of it is The Gaytm or perhaps a reaction to sexism and objectification. Who knows?

I didn't think you were insensitive at all. I totally see what you both were talking about, I was just saying that because untamed said she experienced it mildly before, so I was just questioning whether actual dysphoria can ever be called "mild". I asked it to understand dysphoria better, not because I thought you two were insensitive or something :)

17 hours ago, Cassiopeia said:

But we can agree, gender dysphoria would not be an appropriate term, at least not in my case, because as I said earlier, it is not a gender thing. 

 

Anyway, there is a thing called body dysmorphia, and it can fit the category of something similar to gender dysphoria but its not a gender issue or an ED.

(And no, this part is not really about me, just brain things in general)

I heard about body dysmorphia before and I think for some people it might be hard to tell which of the two applies to them, personally I'm sure though that it isn't something I have. And that is definitely a thing that cis people can get too :P

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@aihpen thanks for clarifying =) I took my words from this " Consequently, the distress is not limited to a desire to simply be of the other gender, but may include a desire to be of an al­ternative gender, provided that it differs from the individual’s assigned gender. ", and I paraphrased to much .__. what I wanted to say was, that you really want to be of your expressed gender, which differs from your bio-sex . The keyword for you is "identify", since you don't feel like your pender (get it? pen? gender? hahah I'm sry I'm gonna lshow myself out |D) should necessarily have a label, aka be identified. But you can feel strongly about your gender, even if you don't identify it via label. The key part for gender dysphoria is the strong psychological strain that comes with the discrepancy between your bio and your preferred/experienced gender, no matter which one either of them is.

Plus, let's not forget: you can feel the distress of gender discrepancy without "qualifying for gender dysphoria". Gender Dysphoria is not a requirement to not be cis.

 

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There's also transabled people. They feel dysphoria around not having a certain disability, most often feeling like a certain limb isn't supposed to be there and they want it removed. So that would be another way that a cis person could feel body dysphoria.

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On 6.12.2016 at 1:34 PM, Kojote said:

I took my words from this " Consequently, the distress is not limited to a desire to simply be of the other gender, but may include a desire to be of an al­ternative gender, provided that it differs from the individual’s assigned gender. ", and I paraphrased to much .__. what I wanted to say was, that you really want to be of your expressed gender, which differs from your bio-sex . The keyword for you is "identify", since you don't feel like your pender (get it? pen? gender? hahah I'm sry I'm gonna lshow myself out |D) should necessarily have a label, aka be identified. But you can feel strongly about your gender, even if you don't identify it via label. The key part for gender dysphoria is the strong psychological strain that comes with the discrepancy between your bio and your preferred/experienced gender, no matter which one either of them is.

That makes sense, I think I know how you mean it now.

On 6.12.2016 at 1:34 PM, Kojote said:

Plus, let's not forget: you can feel the distress of gender discrepancy without "qualifying for gender dysphoria". Gender Dysphoria is not a requirement to not be cis.

Yes this is important. It's something I knew before, I just never heard about how it is the other way around which is why I started this thread :) But I feel this kind of started to drift off topic to what even is gender dysphoria or dysphoria in general... oooops :$ Anyway what you said is always worth mentioning.

 

15 hours ago, Ettina said:

There's also transabled people. They feel dysphoria around not having a certain disability, most often feeling like a certain limb isn't supposed to be there and they want it removed. So that would be another way that a cis person could feel body dysphoria.

I never heard about that, but we can agree that there are more forms of body dysphoria than gender dysphoria, I didn't really phrased my question clear enough. I think I should actually edit my first post, so it's clear that I'm not talking about body dysphoria in general...

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I know a TON of dysphoric women in online lesbian/butch circles, so yeah, it's definitely a thing. Some of them are even detransitioned, but working hard on accepting themselves.

 

I am in a kinda tricky category...I don't think of myself as trans, but since I also don't see myself as a woman, a lot of people would say I'm not cis. I'd say if I count as cis, hell yeah I have dysphoria out the yin yang. Nothing I can really solve, though. Lots of people have various issues that cause physical, sexual, or social dysphoria for whatever reason. Human brainmeats are weird.

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I see a lot of people talk about how they have dysphoria but aren’t trans but not in the way I feel I’m cis female but I don’t feel feminine enough at times

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